Is the United Kingdom Following the United States in Syria?

On June 26, Seifiddine Rezgui wandered onto the Sousse beach resort in Tunisia and opened fire, killing 38, including 30 vacationing British citizens. The Islamic State (ISIS) claimed responsibility for the attack after information was revealed that Rezgui attended an ISIS training camp in Libya and was part of an ISIS sleeper cell in Tunisia.… More Is the United Kingdom Following the United States in Syria?

In a Turbulent Egypt, Progress Depends on Responsible Opposition Leadership

The past turbulent weekend was rife with aggressive expressions of civic discontent in numerous cities throughout Egypt, not only in response to the recent court verdict on the 2012 Port Said football massacre, but against current president Mohammad Morsey. Protests rocked the cities of Cairo, Ismailia, Port Said, Alexandria, and Suez, resulting in hundreds of… More In a Turbulent Egypt, Progress Depends on Responsible Opposition Leadership

Statehood for Palestine?

That Israel would use construction of settlement homes as punishment for the PA pursuing a two state strategy (and it certainly was punishment as Israeli officials warned, after the vote, that there would be swift consequences) demonstrates without a doubt that Israel has no desire to make peace with a Palestinian state. Interestingly, if the Palestinian Authority actually had a peace partner that truly supported a two state solution, this week’s vote would have been significant. Unfortunately, though, the only significant factor was a demonstration of just how dead two states are.… More Statehood for Palestine?

Book Review of Norman Finkelstein’s “Knowing too Much”

Norman Finkelstein released his newest book approximately a week ago and eagerly I ordered it and began reading it. I have been interested in Norman Finkelstein for about five years when I first became involved in the Israel-Palestine conflict and his books have been a beneficial tool in deciphering the conflict. Even at one point… More Book Review of Norman Finkelstein’s “Knowing too Much”

Guest Post: Colonial Shadow Over Algiers and Paris: Memories of the Algerian War

2012 will mark the 50th anniversary of Algerian independence. Both Paris and Algiers are having a hard time sincerely confronting the colonial era and the war, while the politicized cultures of remembrance prevent reconciliation. Fifty years have passed since the Algerian independence from France, and the old wounds haven’t healed – on the contrary. Both… More Guest Post: Colonial Shadow Over Algiers and Paris: Memories of the Algerian War

Arming the FSA in Syria

However, of Drezner’s two viable options, negotiation with the Syrian government is a far better option. Though negotiations would undoubtedly be complicated by the rhetoric of the west in the last few months, it would end the killing quicker – which, I suppose, is what Syrians really want – and would avoid all of the many complications that would arise from a rash policy.… More Arming the FSA in Syria

“It would need a savant to work out the geopolitical implications of a post-Assad Syria”

This is exactly where we find the fault line between political motives and humanitarian motives: to remove Assad or to stop the killing. It is an impossible situation, to be sure.… More “It would need a savant to work out the geopolitical implications of a post-Assad Syria”

Intervention in Syria? Better Not Think First.

Undoubtedly, Russia and China would also block UN authorization of such an intervention while the geographical scope of the country would make Syria far more dangerous than Libya. The complex demographics, on the other hand, would make a post-Assad Syria better resemble a post-Saddam Iraq than a post-Qaddafi Libya. Yet the discussion continues.… More Intervention in Syria? Better Not Think First.